Archive for the ‘Extension’ Tag

Prince’s Million Dollar a Mile Mistake

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

June 10, 2016

Unless you have been living under a rock, you have certainly heard by now that musician, Prince Rogers Nelson, passed away on April 21, 2016.  Unfortunately, he did no advance estate planning which means it is going to be an expensive, public, and litigious affair that will probably last for years.

I have seen estimates of his net worth in the media ranging from $250-$800 million.  Obviously, there is all the easy stuff to value – cash, stocks, bonds, real estate, and personal property.  But putting a value on things like his future royalties on music sales, video sales, his brand image, licensing of his lyrics or music to other artists to cover his songs, etc. is quite a task.

And what about the purported 2,000 or so unreleased songs he is said to have.  How many hits are in there?  Do you think an appraiser is going to sit in a room and listen to songs or read sheet music and put a value on each of them?  And once they come up with a dollar figure, then they have to discount it to the present value, so they would really need to consult their crystal ball for future interest rates, etc.

At one point in my career I worked with the family of a famous deceased musician, and I can tell you first hand that a lot of future value will be determined by how well his heirs maintain or expand the “Prince business machine” that will continue to promote his music and keep it alive, and keep people buying it.  And if the estate gets split up between multiple heirs that do not know each other, there will certainly be a decrease in value.  The last I checked, there was a sister, three half-siblings, and two people claiming to be his son, one of which is in prison, all vying for a piece of Prince’s estate.  So you might have to work with all of these people to buy the rights you need!

Prince certainly is not the first musician to have his estate valued, and there are accepted norms of how appraisers come to values, but I can tell you this much, whatever number they come to will not even be close to correct!  And there will certainly be a lot of negotiating between IRS appraisers and appraisers hired by Bremer Trust, the wealth management firm appointed to handle his estate.

And by the way, all of this is supposed to be done and estate taxes calculated and paid within nine months…in a perfect world.  The Form 706 United States Estate (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, which will list every single asset in his estate, (right down to the change in his pockets) with descriptions, values, and support for valuations is due January 21, 2017.  It is the mother of all tax returns.

The administrator of the estate can file a six month extension for the return, and the IRS can grant an additional year to pay the tax, but interest will start accruing on any unpaid tax after January 21st.  In situations with reasonable cause, the IRS can grant additional one year extensions for up to four and sometimes up to 10 years to pay the tax.  Although, they could also be assessed additional penalties.  The estate could also do an installment agreement for up to 14 years to pay the tax over time.

The extensions of time to pay, although not granted easily, are  designed to protect the interests of the heirs and the IRS.  With a massive estate and so many unknown quantities and litigation, you would have to have a fire sale to generate enough cash to pay the estate tax within nine months.

So how much estate tax will be paid?

The federal return will provide for a $5.45 million exemption for people dying in 2016.  That assumes that he made no lifetime gifts over the annual exclusion amount (currently $14,000 per person per year, and less in prior years).  It would be silly to assume someone of his wealth made no large gifts to individuals during his lifetime.  From what I have read about Prince, he probably made quite a few.  Any gifts he made in excess of the annual exclusion amounts would reduce his $5.45 million exemption.  For simplicity, though, let’s assume he made none.  So the first $5.45 million is tax free.  The rate of tax then slides from 18 percent on value in excess of $5.45 million to the top rate of 40 percent on everything over $6.45 million.  So for the first $6.45 million of his estate, a tax of $345,800 will be paid, and then 40 percent on everything over that.

Let’s assume his estate ends up being valued at $550 million and there ends up being $50 million in litigation and estate expenses leaving $500 million potentially taxable.  His federal estate tax would be $197,765,800.

Ahh, but Prince lived in Minnesota!  He was unfortunate enough to make his home in one of the 19 states (plus Washington DC) that have their own estate and/or inheritance tax.

Due to his residency the estate will also need to file a Form M706, the Minnesota equivalent of the federal Form 706. Minnesota will have a $1.6 million exemption.  The rate of tax then slides from ten percent on value in excess of $1.6 million to the top rate of 16 percent on everything over $10,300,000.  So for the first $10,300,000 of his estate a tax of $1,080,000 will be paid, and $1,600,000 for each additional $10,000,000.  So his Minnesota estate tax will be $79,432,000.

The Minnesota estate tax paid will fortunately be an additional deduction on the federal return.  So 40 percent of $79,432,000 will reduce the federal estate tax bill by $31,772,800, resulting in a $165,993,000 balance.

That will bring his total estate tax bill to $245,425,000, or roughly 49 percent, leaving his heirs with $254,575,000 to split up.

Besides all of the typical and sometimes fancy estate planning that could have been done to avoid costly litigation, and perhaps save tax through things like irrevocable life insurance trusts and other tricks up an estate planners sleeve,  I wonder if he ever simply considered setting up shop 45 miles away across the St. Croix river in Wisconsin?  It might have saved his estate $47 million – that is over $1 million per mile!

Although most people do not have $245 million estate tax bills for their heirs to worry about (or any estate tax at all), planning in advance and understanding the rules surrounding your tax and financial life is always important.  Sometimes even little things, learned early, can make a big difference.  And building a relationship with someone that can keep you on the right track is certainly of value.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog .

Travis H. Long, CPA, Inc. is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. Travis can be reached at 831-333-1041. This article is for educational purposes.  Although believed to be accurate in most situations, it does not constitute professional advice or establish a client relationship.

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Back to Basics Part XIII – Form 4868 Application for Automatic Extension

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

April 3, 2015

Two weeks ago we discussed underpayment of estimated tax – a penalty that is assessed prior to the April 15 due date if you did not pay enough tax in ratably throughout the prior year.  Essentially these penalties are the equivalent of the taxing authorities wanting to be paid in installments rather than a lump sum check at the end of the year.  (You would be equally upset if your employer only paid you once a year as well!)  So they effectively charge you interest (currently a three percent rate) if you do not have enough tax paid in quarterly throughout the year.  This week we are going to talk about filing an extension and the penalties and interest that you will incur beginning after April 15 if you do not file and/or pay on time.  If you would like to catch up on our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns, prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog .

The most important piece of advice is to file your return on time!  When I say on time, I mean by April 15, or if you file a valid extension, then by October 15.  In years where those dates fall on a weekend or holiday, the return due date is pushed to the next business day.  There can be hefty penalties for filing a late return, which we will discuss later.   Form 4868 is the federal form used to apply for an extension, and you have to postmark it by April 15 for it to be valid.  If you are concerned of a postal mishap, U.S. certified mail is the correct way to document it was mailed on time.  California gives you an automatic six month extension if you need it, and nothing is required to be filed to receive the extension.  (Note there are exceptions regarding extensions for individuals out of the country on April 15, as well as for military people overseas, which we are not discussing in this article.)

Regardless of whether or not you file an extension, the tax is still due on April 15.  So you want to be sure you have enough tax paid in to cover the liability when you finally do file the return.  This means, you have to do a rough calculation at least, and then send in a check for the estimated tax with the 4868.  It would be prudent to estimate on the high side if there is any doubt.  If you end up not owing as much as you paid in, you can get a refund when you file the returns, or you can have it applied to the next year’s tax returns, and it will be credited to you as of the original April 15 due date when the first estimated tax payment was also due for the current year taxes (for those that pay quarterly estimates, this is very helpful).

When putting people on extension that pay quarterly estimated taxes, I will typically have them pay the remaining projected balance due from the prior year, plus the first quarter estimate for the current year and have all of this applied as a payment towards the prior year return.  This gives them a cushion in case the estimates are wrong.  Then, after the returns are filed, any leftover amount is then applied to the current year return and gets credit as of April 15 and everything is fine.  If you project you will owe to California, then you will have to fill out a California Form 3519 Payment for Automatic Extension for Individuals and remit a check with that form.

The mechanics of filing the federal Form 4868 are quite simple.  On the left side of the form you fill out your name, address, and social security number.  On the right side you list your estimate of your total tax liability, the amount you have paid in so far, and then subtract the two to get the estimated amount you are short or over.  If you are short, then you write in how much you are planning to pay with the extension.   Hopefully you have enough to pay the balance, but if you do not, just pay what you can, and keep making payments when possible.  Write your name, social security number, the year for which the tax is due and “Form 4868” on the check as well.

The California Form 3519 Payment for Automatic Extension is quite simple also.  You do not even have to list estimates, but just the amount you are paying in addition to your name, address, etc.  You would provide similar information on your check to California as well.  Federal checks are made out to the “United States Treasury.”  California checks are made out to the “Franchise Tax Board.”  The mailing addresses are on the forms and related instructions, which can be downloaded online for free. If you are sending in a check for a married filing joint tax return, it is best to put both taxpayer names and social security numbers on the forms AND on the checks.

Now let’s talk about what penalties and interest you will incur if you do not file on time and/or pay on time.

Late Return Penalty

As I mentioned earlier, the most important piece of advice is to file your return on time!  A late tax return with the IRS carries a hefty penalty of five percent of the unpaid tax PER MONTH or portion of a month until you file your tax returns.  For those of you who aren’t doing the math in your head, that is the equivalent of an annualized interest rate of 60 percent per year (and you thought credit cards were bad!).  Fortunately they cap that penalty after five months of delinquency thus maxing it out at 25 percent.  Not to be left out, California conforms to this and charges the same for late returns based on the amount of California tax owed.

Late Payment Penalty

Regardless of whether or not you file an extension, if you do not pay the tax by April 15, the IRS will assess you 0.5 percent PER MONTH on the unpaid tax, capping out after 50 months at 25 percent.  If the return is also delinquent (no extension filed), the five percent per month late return penalty includes the 0.5 percent per month late payment penalty for the first five months.  After the first five months, then you only pay the additional 0.5 percent late payment penalty.  So the maximum federal late return and late payment penalty could be 25 percent late return penalty (4.5 percent plus 0.5 percent for five months) plus another 22.5 percent (0.5 percent per month for the next 45 months for the continuing late payment penalty) equals a total of 47.5 percent.  California has a slightly different approach on this and immediately charges five percent of the balance if you are even one day late.  In addition they assess 0.5 percent PER MONTH or part of a month for the first 40 months, also capping you at 25 percent.  So one day late in California will actually cost you 5.5 percent in late payment penalties.

Interest

In addition to the above penalties, interest is also charged starting on April 16 until the taxing authorities get paid in full.  Since you had the use of the money and they did not, they want to be paid for their lost use of the funds.  The interest rate varies and is adjusted each quarter for the IRS and twice a year for California.  The current interest rate is three percent for both the IRS and California.  If you had the money sitting in a bank account, you clearly lost out, however, if you had it invested in the markets, you would have probably come out ahead in the past few years.  Whereas, you can sometimes get the taxing authorities to waive penalties if you had reasonable cause, interest is virtually impossible to waive.  Without the before mentioned penalties, there are many people that would love a three percent loan!

If you have noticed a common thread for the above interest and penalties, it is that they are all based on the amount of tax you were short starting on April 15.  If you had paid in more than enough on April 15, there would be no penalties and interest, even if you did not file an extension.  Theoretically, you could file several years late and incur no penalties as long as you eventually give them a return showing all the tax had been paid in on time.  I do not recommend this practice, however!  Eventually you would receive notices and they would even estimate a tax return for you and assess tax, penalties, and interest.  Those are usually not in your favor!  Also, you never start the statute of limitations running, so you keep yourself open for audit longer.

Most importantly, like me, have fun when you are preparing these forms.  If you find all of this interesting, perhaps you should have become an accountant!

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Can’t Finish Returns by October 15 Deadline?

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

October 5, 2012

If you placed your 2011 personal tax returns on extension, you have 10 days left to complete the returns and get them filed.  This is especially important if you did not withhold enough tax or make enough estimated tax payments during the year to cover your tax liability that was technically due on April 17.  Penalties are assessed based on the unpaid balance of tax that was due on that date.  There are several penalties assessed, but the hefty penalty is the late filing penalty which equates to five percent of your unpaid tax as of April 17 for each month or part of a month the return is late (capped at 25 percent).

In the past, I have had problematic situations where a client did not receive tax documents until after October 15.  This is sometimes seen when a client is invested in a partnership or has an interest in an S-Corporation or LLC and that entity is filing their returns late – causing all the others to be late as well.  There are even situations when other entities are filing timely and it can cause you to be late.  An example of this would be if you were a beneficiary of an irrevocable trust.  These types of trusts generally have the same due dates that your personal returns do – April 15, with a six month extension to October 15.  What if the trust is completed at the end of the day on October 15?  Will the beneficiary be able to get their K-1 tax document and provide to their accountant to finish before midnight!!  Maybe not!

So what do you do if you still cannot file by October 15?  Is there any hope?  There are some specific exceptions for military service members and taxpayers working abroad, but if you do not qualify for those exceptions, what then?  One option would be to wait until the information is received and then file the return requesting penalty relief for reasonable cause.  This is a tough row to hoe in actuality, because the IRS places a high degree of responsibility on the taxpayer:  I can almost guarantee you that what you feel is reasonable will not be the same as what the IRS feels is reasonable!  You will be categorized as delinquent from the outset, and then you will start on the defensive.

A better solution in many cases would be to go ahead and file a tax return with the information available and your best estimate of any missing information.  (There are provisions in the code that allow for estimates under certain circumstances.)  A statement should be included with the return explaining the situation and the efforts made to obtain the information.  You should also state the intent to amend the return if materially different from the actual information when it is available.  This would prevent a late filing penalty from being assessed, and you would be categorized as timely filed unless the return is challenged by audit.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Paying the IRS: Installment Agreements

Originally published in the Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin

May 2, 2012

Hopefully by now you have filed your tax returns.  If you decided to file for an extension, that is fine, but keep in mind you have not extended your time to pay any tax owed.  That was still due on April 17th.  Filing the extension was key, however, because a late filing penalty is assessed at five percent of the balance owed for every month the return is late (capped at 25 percent).  If you do not owe taxes, you are fine, even if you did not file an extension, since the penalty is based on the balance owed.

If you did file your return and you could not come up with enough cash to pay the IRS, you have payment options.  If you feel you can pay the IRS within 120 days, call 1-800-829-1040 and advise them of this fact and they will not harass you for payment and you can avoid the cost of setting up an installment agreement.

If you need to make payments over time by setting up an installment agreement, the IRS will generally allow this quite easily if your balance is below $25,000, you can pay it off in seven years, and you are in good standing with the IRS.  This is accomplished by filing Form 9465.  There is a $105 fee to set up an installment agreement, unless you elect electronic payment withdrawals from your bank – this cuts the fee down to $52.  Interest accrues at a variable rate which changes every quarter (currently three percent per annum) and late payment penalties may also still be assessed (1/2 percent per month, or portion thereof – approximately six percent per annum).  Other minor penalties may apply also.

In practice, I have never had an installment agreement under $25,000 turned down or even questioned by offering a monthly payment amount equal to the starting principal balance divided by 60. If you owe over $25,000, you have to provide detailed information about your financial situation through additional forms before an installment agreement is granted.  With an installment agreement in place, you avoid harassing letters and other possible collection actions such as levying bank accounts, garnishment of wages, forcing the sale of assets, etc.  (Forcing the sale of assets is rare unless you owe at least $100,000…and are obstinate!)

If you have large tax debts that may be difficult or impossible to pay there are other less friendly avenues such as offers in compromise, or even bankruptcy filing if the tax debts are at least three years old.

California has a less generous installment agreement option, but can be requested by filing FTB Form 3567.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Filing an Extension

Originally Published in the Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin

April 6, 2011

 

Imagine opening a letter from the IRS assessing you an $18,000 penalty because they claim you did not file your extension on time!  I once worked with a client that was faced with this exact problem.  The irritating part is that an extension request is an arguably meaningless filing since it is automatically granted if requested. Nonetheless, the IRS takes it seriously.

So with April 18th fast approaching (taxes are not due on the 15th due to the federal observation of the signing of the Compensated Emancipation Act by Abraham Lincoln in 1862), how can you protect yourself?  If you are filing your own extension for your personal tax returns with the IRS use Form 4868.  Be sure to get some kind of proof of delivery and make a copy of the extension.  Even with delivery confirmation it is difficult to prove what you sent.  The best way is to e-file the extension through home-use tax software or by using a tax professional that e-files and obtains an electronic confirmation.  What about California?  In the midst of a tiresome sea of nonconformity with the IRS, I applaud California for this one act – you need not file a form to be granted an automatic extension! After you have filed your federal extension you have until October 15, 2011 (six months) to file your returns.

BEWARE!!  Just because you file an extension does not grant you additional time to pay!  The tax you calculate on the return you are going to prepare and file by October is still due by April 18.  So if you think you might not have enough tax withheld, you need to make some good estimates and send in some checks.  You may want to hire a tax professional to help with this calculation.  You can send the federal check with Form 4868.  For California, you can use FTB Form 3519 to send with your check.  There are also electronic options for paying both of these.

If you do not pay your tax or file your return on time, interest and penalties are calculated based on any amount of tax you come up short. Interest varies with market changes (currently 4 percent a year for the IRS). IRS late payment penalties are ½ percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).  If you fail to timely file, the IRS penalties are 5 percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).  You may also incur underpayment of estimated tax penalties depending on your circumstances.  California interest and penalties are similar or higher.

Oh, and remember my client with the $18,000 penalty – fortunately we were able to successfully petition to get the penalty waived!

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, Pacific Grove, CA.  Travis can be reached at 831-333-1041.