Archive for the ‘Gift Tax’ Tag

Prince’s Million Dollar a Mile Mistake

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

June 10, 2016

Unless you have been living under a rock, you have certainly heard by now that musician, Prince Rogers Nelson, passed away on April 21, 2016.  Unfortunately, he did no advance estate planning which means it is going to be an expensive, public, and litigious affair that will probably last for years.

I have seen estimates of his net worth in the media ranging from $250-$800 million.  Obviously, there is all the easy stuff to value – cash, stocks, bonds, real estate, and personal property.  But putting a value on things like his future royalties on music sales, video sales, his brand image, licensing of his lyrics or music to other artists to cover his songs, etc. is quite a task.

And what about the purported 2,000 or so unreleased songs he is said to have.  How many hits are in there?  Do you think an appraiser is going to sit in a room and listen to songs or read sheet music and put a value on each of them?  And once they come up with a dollar figure, then they have to discount it to the present value, so they would really need to consult their crystal ball for future interest rates, etc.

At one point in my career I worked with the family of a famous deceased musician, and I can tell you first hand that a lot of future value will be determined by how well his heirs maintain or expand the “Prince business machine” that will continue to promote his music and keep it alive, and keep people buying it.  And if the estate gets split up between multiple heirs that do not know each other, there will certainly be a decrease in value.  The last I checked, there was a sister, three half-siblings, and two people claiming to be his son, one of which is in prison, all vying for a piece of Prince’s estate.  So you might have to work with all of these people to buy the rights you need!

Prince certainly is not the first musician to have his estate valued, and there are accepted norms of how appraisers come to values, but I can tell you this much, whatever number they come to will not even be close to correct!  And there will certainly be a lot of negotiating between IRS appraisers and appraisers hired by Bremer Trust, the wealth management firm appointed to handle his estate.

And by the way, all of this is supposed to be done and estate taxes calculated and paid within nine months…in a perfect world.  The Form 706 United States Estate (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, which will list every single asset in his estate, (right down to the change in his pockets) with descriptions, values, and support for valuations is due January 21, 2017.  It is the mother of all tax returns.

The administrator of the estate can file a six month extension for the return, and the IRS can grant an additional year to pay the tax, but interest will start accruing on any unpaid tax after January 21st.  In situations with reasonable cause, the IRS can grant additional one year extensions for up to four and sometimes up to 10 years to pay the tax.  Although, they could also be assessed additional penalties.  The estate could also do an installment agreement for up to 14 years to pay the tax over time.

The extensions of time to pay, although not granted easily, are  designed to protect the interests of the heirs and the IRS.  With a massive estate and so many unknown quantities and litigation, you would have to have a fire sale to generate enough cash to pay the estate tax within nine months.

So how much estate tax will be paid?

The federal return will provide for a $5.45 million exemption for people dying in 2016.  That assumes that he made no lifetime gifts over the annual exclusion amount (currently $14,000 per person per year, and less in prior years).  It would be silly to assume someone of his wealth made no large gifts to individuals during his lifetime.  From what I have read about Prince, he probably made quite a few.  Any gifts he made in excess of the annual exclusion amounts would reduce his $5.45 million exemption.  For simplicity, though, let’s assume he made none.  So the first $5.45 million is tax free.  The rate of tax then slides from 18 percent on value in excess of $5.45 million to the top rate of 40 percent on everything over $6.45 million.  So for the first $6.45 million of his estate, a tax of $345,800 will be paid, and then 40 percent on everything over that.

Let’s assume his estate ends up being valued at $550 million and there ends up being $50 million in litigation and estate expenses leaving $500 million potentially taxable.  His federal estate tax would be $197,765,800.

Ahh, but Prince lived in Minnesota!  He was unfortunate enough to make his home in one of the 19 states (plus Washington DC) that have their own estate and/or inheritance tax.

Due to his residency the estate will also need to file a Form M706, the Minnesota equivalent of the federal Form 706. Minnesota will have a $1.6 million exemption.  The rate of tax then slides from ten percent on value in excess of $1.6 million to the top rate of 16 percent on everything over $10,300,000.  So for the first $10,300,000 of his estate a tax of $1,080,000 will be paid, and $1,600,000 for each additional $10,000,000.  So his Minnesota estate tax will be $79,432,000.

The Minnesota estate tax paid will fortunately be an additional deduction on the federal return.  So 40 percent of $79,432,000 will reduce the federal estate tax bill by $31,772,800, resulting in a $165,993,000 balance.

That will bring his total estate tax bill to $245,425,000, or roughly 49 percent, leaving his heirs with $254,575,000 to split up.

Besides all of the typical and sometimes fancy estate planning that could have been done to avoid costly litigation, and perhaps save tax through things like irrevocable life insurance trusts and other tricks up an estate planners sleeve,  I wonder if he ever simply considered setting up shop 45 miles away across the St. Croix river in Wisconsin?  It might have saved his estate $47 million – that is over $1 million per mile!

Although most people do not have $245 million estate tax bills for their heirs to worry about (or any estate tax at all), planning in advance and understanding the rules surrounding your tax and financial life is always important.  Sometimes even little things, learned early, can make a big difference.  And building a relationship with someone that can keep you on the right track is certainly of value.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog .

Travis H. Long, CPA, Inc. is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. Travis can be reached at 831-333-1041. This article is for educational purposes.  Although believed to be accurate in most situations, it does not constitute professional advice or establish a client relationship.

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Gifts Given and Received – Taxable?

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

December 27, 2013

I remember when I was growing up, every year for Christmas, my grandfather would send a check to my brother and I for $75 each.  That seemed like an incredible amount of money to me at the time, and it really boosted my treasury each year!  One of those years, I can remember going to the bank with my mom to cash the check, and wanting to see what $75 felt like in my own two hands; I asked the teller to give it to me…all in ones.  She smiled, pulled some crisp ones from under her drawer, and counted them out for me.  I had never felt a wad of bills like that in my hands!  I tried folding them over, but I could not get them all in my pocket it was so thick, so I put them in lengthwise, and they just about stuck out the top of my pants pocket – I was a rich man!

After a week or so, we came back and deposited about half of them back into my bank account.  My dad had always encouraged us to save half of whatever we received or earned when we were growing up.  I admit, that ratio did not quite remain when I got into high school, and discovered a new and expensive hobby called, girls, but saving was ingrained in me.  When I left for college I had a measurable chunk of change in my bank account.

Throughout those years, it never occurred to me to wonder about the tax implications of the gifts I received.  Now, however, I think a lot about those things!

I do not know anyone that would hesitate to put a gift of $75 into his or her bank account.  But if you throw two or three zeroes on the end, then I definitely get questions from people wondering if it they will have to pay tax.  As the recipient of a gift, whether it is $75 or $75 million dollars, you do not have to pay taxes or report the receipt of the gift (with one exception that I can think of to be explained later).  If you receive something other than cash, such as stocks, real estate, or tangible property, you could have tax if you sell it.  The catch is that when you receive noncash gifts, you also receive the giftor’s cost basis, and when you sell you have taxable gain on the difference between the sales price and the cost basis.  For example, if someone gives you a share of stock worth $100, and that person bought it for only $10, you have to pay tax on the $90 gain if you sell it.

If you put yourself in the shoes of the person giving the gift, there are different rules you need to follow.  As long as you give less than $14,000 (2013 and 2014) a year in combined cash or noncash items to any one person, you have nothing to worry about, except providing the person evidence of your cost basis if the items are noncash items.  (You are doing a disservice if you do not provide proof of cost basis, since the person you give the noncash items to could potentially be held liable for tax on the entire amount of the gift if they sell it, and cannot prove your cost basis – this is often overlooked.)  You could give $14,000 to every person on earth each year and not have to file a gift tax return.

If you give $14,001 to just one person, then you have to file a Form 709 United States Gift Tax Return.  The portion in excess of $14,000 per person is then subtracted from your combined gift and estate tax exemption (currently $5.25 million and indexed for inflation).  For most people this is just an informational filing as they will never reach the limits, but it is required (and limits have gone up and down in the past).  If you exceed the limits, however, the person giving the gift has a tax liability at a rate as a high as 40 percent.  The only possible time I can think of that the IRS could pursue the recipient of a gift for taxes would be if the giftor gave away so much money that he or she had a tax liability and could not pay it.  The IRS in that case, could pursue the person receiving a gift for tax.

Keep in mind that a gift is different from inheriting when someone passes away.  You generally do not have tax on inherited amounts either, with the exception of tax liability on any earnings the assets you are entitled to accumulate between the date of the peron’s passing, and the date you receive the property.  Your cost basis with inherited assets is also generally more favorable as the cost basis you receive is typically the fair market value at the date the person passed away, and not their old, often lower, cost basis.

Crafty minds will sometimes think of schemes to call income a gift since gifts are not taxable.  Be careful of this – substance over form will rule the day.  Yes, it would be nice if I would do your tax preparation for free, and you also happen to be kind enough to give me money, but it ain’t gonna fly!

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Tax Changes on the Horizon?

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

October 19, 2012

Unless you have been hiding under a rock, you are sure to have heard the hubbub surrounding potential tax increases in 2013.  These tax increases do not require Congress to take action, but to gridlock and do nothing, which is why they stand a much better chance of actually occurring than a concerted effort to raise taxes. Most of the increases are the result of the expiration of the temporary tax decreases dubbed “The Bush Tax Cuts,” passed in 2001 and 2003 while George W. Bush was in office.  There was also a two percent reduction in payroll taxes a few years ago that was meant to be a temporary stimulus for the economy.  The Tax Policy Center estimates that nearly 90% of American households will face an average tax increase of $3,500 if the tax cuts expire.

If current legislation stays in place, ordinary income tax brackets will jump 3-5%, depending on your bracket.  Capital gains tax will increase 5-15%, depending on your bracket, and there will be a new Medicare surtax, generally for people making over $200,000, of another 3.8% on net investment income.

Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) is another big issue that could affect most Americans.  AMT is a parallel tax calculation that runs alongside the normal system, cutting out common deductions, and if it results in a higher overall tax liability, you pay the incremental difference as additional tax.

Estate and lifetime gift tax will also get hit hard.  Currently, there is a $5,120,000 exemption for the combined estate and gift tax.  If you have a taxable estate above that and you pass away by December 31, the excess will be taxed at a top rate of 35%. Next year, this exemption reverts to $1,000,000 with a maximum tax rate of 55% on your taxable estate above that figure.

This certainly presents questions for you, your tax professional, and your estate planner to analyze.  If you knew ordinary tax rates, capital gains, and estate tax rates were going to rise next year, you would likely try to push expected income from next year to this year, sell your stocks now that could result in a gain in the future, and gift money from your estate to your heirs.  It is not quite this simple, and you should get professional assistance, but it is something to think about now rather than December 31st.

Related to the estate and gift tax issue, on Saturday morning, October 27th, I will be presenting with local attorney, Kyle A. Krasa, and local investment advisor, Henry Nigos, in a free seminar titled “Opportunities and Clawbacks – Taking Advantage of the Once-in-a-Lifetime 2012 Estate/Gift Tax Rules” from 10:00 am to 11:30 am at 700 Jewell Avenue, Pacific Grove.  The seminar is sponsored by Krasa Law – please RSVP at 831-920-0205.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.