Archive for the ‘Form 4868’ Tag

Back to Basics Part XIII – Form 4868 Application for Automatic Extension

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

April 3, 2015

Two weeks ago we discussed underpayment of estimated tax – a penalty that is assessed prior to the April 15 due date if you did not pay enough tax in ratably throughout the prior year.  Essentially these penalties are the equivalent of the taxing authorities wanting to be paid in installments rather than a lump sum check at the end of the year.  (You would be equally upset if your employer only paid you once a year as well!)  So they effectively charge you interest (currently a three percent rate) if you do not have enough tax paid in quarterly throughout the year.  This week we are going to talk about filing an extension and the penalties and interest that you will incur beginning after April 15 if you do not file and/or pay on time.  If you would like to catch up on our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns, prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog .

The most important piece of advice is to file your return on time!  When I say on time, I mean by April 15, or if you file a valid extension, then by October 15.  In years where those dates fall on a weekend or holiday, the return due date is pushed to the next business day.  There can be hefty penalties for filing a late return, which we will discuss later.   Form 4868 is the federal form used to apply for an extension, and you have to postmark it by April 15 for it to be valid.  If you are concerned of a postal mishap, U.S. certified mail is the correct way to document it was mailed on time.  California gives you an automatic six month extension if you need it, and nothing is required to be filed to receive the extension.  (Note there are exceptions regarding extensions for individuals out of the country on April 15, as well as for military people overseas, which we are not discussing in this article.)

Regardless of whether or not you file an extension, the tax is still due on April 15.  So you want to be sure you have enough tax paid in to cover the liability when you finally do file the return.  This means, you have to do a rough calculation at least, and then send in a check for the estimated tax with the 4868.  It would be prudent to estimate on the high side if there is any doubt.  If you end up not owing as much as you paid in, you can get a refund when you file the returns, or you can have it applied to the next year’s tax returns, and it will be credited to you as of the original April 15 due date when the first estimated tax payment was also due for the current year taxes (for those that pay quarterly estimates, this is very helpful).

When putting people on extension that pay quarterly estimated taxes, I will typically have them pay the remaining projected balance due from the prior year, plus the first quarter estimate for the current year and have all of this applied as a payment towards the prior year return.  This gives them a cushion in case the estimates are wrong.  Then, after the returns are filed, any leftover amount is then applied to the current year return and gets credit as of April 15 and everything is fine.  If you project you will owe to California, then you will have to fill out a California Form 3519 Payment for Automatic Extension for Individuals and remit a check with that form.

The mechanics of filing the federal Form 4868 are quite simple.  On the left side of the form you fill out your name, address, and social security number.  On the right side you list your estimate of your total tax liability, the amount you have paid in so far, and then subtract the two to get the estimated amount you are short or over.  If you are short, then you write in how much you are planning to pay with the extension.   Hopefully you have enough to pay the balance, but if you do not, just pay what you can, and keep making payments when possible.  Write your name, social security number, the year for which the tax is due and “Form 4868” on the check as well.

The California Form 3519 Payment for Automatic Extension is quite simple also.  You do not even have to list estimates, but just the amount you are paying in addition to your name, address, etc.  You would provide similar information on your check to California as well.  Federal checks are made out to the “United States Treasury.”  California checks are made out to the “Franchise Tax Board.”  The mailing addresses are on the forms and related instructions, which can be downloaded online for free. If you are sending in a check for a married filing joint tax return, it is best to put both taxpayer names and social security numbers on the forms AND on the checks.

Now let’s talk about what penalties and interest you will incur if you do not file on time and/or pay on time.

Late Return Penalty

As I mentioned earlier, the most important piece of advice is to file your return on time!  A late tax return with the IRS carries a hefty penalty of five percent of the unpaid tax PER MONTH or portion of a month until you file your tax returns.  For those of you who aren’t doing the math in your head, that is the equivalent of an annualized interest rate of 60 percent per year (and you thought credit cards were bad!).  Fortunately they cap that penalty after five months of delinquency thus maxing it out at 25 percent.  Not to be left out, California conforms to this and charges the same for late returns based on the amount of California tax owed.

Late Payment Penalty

Regardless of whether or not you file an extension, if you do not pay the tax by April 15, the IRS will assess you 0.5 percent PER MONTH on the unpaid tax, capping out after 50 months at 25 percent.  If the return is also delinquent (no extension filed), the five percent per month late return penalty includes the 0.5 percent per month late payment penalty for the first five months.  After the first five months, then you only pay the additional 0.5 percent late payment penalty.  So the maximum federal late return and late payment penalty could be 25 percent late return penalty (4.5 percent plus 0.5 percent for five months) plus another 22.5 percent (0.5 percent per month for the next 45 months for the continuing late payment penalty) equals a total of 47.5 percent.  California has a slightly different approach on this and immediately charges five percent of the balance if you are even one day late.  In addition they assess 0.5 percent PER MONTH or part of a month for the first 40 months, also capping you at 25 percent.  So one day late in California will actually cost you 5.5 percent in late payment penalties.

Interest

In addition to the above penalties, interest is also charged starting on April 16 until the taxing authorities get paid in full.  Since you had the use of the money and they did not, they want to be paid for their lost use of the funds.  The interest rate varies and is adjusted each quarter for the IRS and twice a year for California.  The current interest rate is three percent for both the IRS and California.  If you had the money sitting in a bank account, you clearly lost out, however, if you had it invested in the markets, you would have probably come out ahead in the past few years.  Whereas, you can sometimes get the taxing authorities to waive penalties if you had reasonable cause, interest is virtually impossible to waive.  Without the before mentioned penalties, there are many people that would love a three percent loan!

If you have noticed a common thread for the above interest and penalties, it is that they are all based on the amount of tax you were short starting on April 15.  If you had paid in more than enough on April 15, there would be no penalties and interest, even if you did not file an extension.  Theoretically, you could file several years late and incur no penalties as long as you eventually give them a return showing all the tax had been paid in on time.  I do not recommend this practice, however!  Eventually you would receive notices and they would even estimate a tax return for you and assess tax, penalties, and interest.  Those are usually not in your favor!  Also, you never start the statute of limitations running, so you keep yourself open for audit longer.

Most importantly, like me, have fun when you are preparing these forms.  If you find all of this interesting, perhaps you should have become an accountant!

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Tax Deadline Looms

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

April 4, 2014

If you have been hibernating through the winter months, it is time to awaken from your slumber and complete your tax returns for 2013.  As a tax professional it is interesting to see how each tax season seems to take on a flavor of its own.  This year I found that many clients did not come in early, but delayed gathering their tax information, and came in much later.  Another professional in the area called me last week and said he was experiencing the same issue.  Compressing an already compressed time frame certainly makes for long hours, and will probably lead to more extensions as well.

Over the past few years, new rules have been phasing-in which force financial companies to report cost basis in the stock they sell on your behalf.  (Generally I like this new requirement as I have to repaint my ceiling much less frequently as clients are no longer staring at it so intently to come up with the basis in the stock they inherited  thirty years ago.)  I recall last year, we had many clients with revised 1099 financial packages being issued well into late March.  Although I did not see a lot of late issued/revised financial packages this year, I have a feeling that has something to do with why many people opted to bring in their information later.

Technically, you are supposed to file an amendment if additional information surfaces that was not reported on your original returns.   This can be cost prohibitive, however, especially if it consists of minor changes.  If these items are missed, sometimes the IRS will just send a proposed adjustment and basically rework the tax return for you and propose a balance to pay.  California’s Franchise Tax Board will typically follow-up as well once they get wind of the issue from the IRS..

If you cannot get your returns completed on time, then you may wish to file an extension.

If you are filing your own extension for your personal tax returns with the IRS use Form 4868.  Be sure to get some kind of proof of delivery and make a copy of the extension.  Even with delivery confirmation it is difficult to prove what you sent.  The best way is to e-file the extension through home-use tax software or by using a tax professional that e-files and obtains an electronic submission ID (the new modernized e-file system replaces the old declaration control number system with submission IDs).  What about California?  In the midst of a tiresome sea of nonconformity with the IRS, I continue to applaud California for this one act – you need not file a form to be granted an automatic extension! After you have filed your federal extension you have until October 15, 2014 (six months) to file your California personal return as well.

BEWARE!!  Just because you file an extension does not grant you additional time to pay!  The tax you calculate on the return you are going to prepare and file by October is still due by April 15.  So if you think you might not have enough tax withheld, you need to make some good estimates and send in some checks.  You may want to hire a tax professional to help with this calculation.  You can send the federal check with Form 4868.  For California, you can use FTB Form 3519 to send with your check.  There are also electronic options for paying both of these.

If you do not pay your tax or file your return on time, interest and penalties are calculated based on any amount of tax you come up short. Interest varies with market changes (currently three percent a year for the IRS and California).

If you file an extension, but do not pay in enough tax by April 15, you will pay late payment penalties and interest.  The IRS late payment penalties are a half-percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).  California will charge you five percent up front plus another half percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).

If you fail to file an extension or file after the extended due date, the IRS and California penalties are each five percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).  California has an additional trick.  If you extend your return and then file late, they go all the way back to the original due date to calculate penalties and interest owed as if you never had an extension.

You may also incur underpayment of estimated tax penalties depending on your circumstances.

One other nice thing to know: if you owe no tax, you will owe no penalties, even if you file late.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Filing an Extension

Originally Published in the Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin

April 6, 2011

 

Imagine opening a letter from the IRS assessing you an $18,000 penalty because they claim you did not file your extension on time!  I once worked with a client that was faced with this exact problem.  The irritating part is that an extension request is an arguably meaningless filing since it is automatically granted if requested. Nonetheless, the IRS takes it seriously.

So with April 18th fast approaching (taxes are not due on the 15th due to the federal observation of the signing of the Compensated Emancipation Act by Abraham Lincoln in 1862), how can you protect yourself?  If you are filing your own extension for your personal tax returns with the IRS use Form 4868.  Be sure to get some kind of proof of delivery and make a copy of the extension.  Even with delivery confirmation it is difficult to prove what you sent.  The best way is to e-file the extension through home-use tax software or by using a tax professional that e-files and obtains an electronic confirmation.  What about California?  In the midst of a tiresome sea of nonconformity with the IRS, I applaud California for this one act – you need not file a form to be granted an automatic extension! After you have filed your federal extension you have until October 15, 2011 (six months) to file your returns.

BEWARE!!  Just because you file an extension does not grant you additional time to pay!  The tax you calculate on the return you are going to prepare and file by October is still due by April 18.  So if you think you might not have enough tax withheld, you need to make some good estimates and send in some checks.  You may want to hire a tax professional to help with this calculation.  You can send the federal check with Form 4868.  For California, you can use FTB Form 3519 to send with your check.  There are also electronic options for paying both of these.

If you do not pay your tax or file your return on time, interest and penalties are calculated based on any amount of tax you come up short. Interest varies with market changes (currently 4 percent a year for the IRS). IRS late payment penalties are ½ percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).  If you fail to timely file, the IRS penalties are 5 percent of the balance each month (up to 25 percent).  You may also incur underpayment of estimated tax penalties depending on your circumstances.  California interest and penalties are similar or higher.

Oh, and remember my client with the $18,000 penalty – fortunately we were able to successfully petition to get the penalty waived!

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, Pacific Grove, CA.  Travis can be reached at 831-333-1041.