Archive for the ‘community property’ Tag

Back To Basics Part VII – Schedule C

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

January 9, 2015

In this issue, we are discussing Schedule C -Profit or Loss from Business.  Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog if you would like to catch up on our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns.

Schedule C is generally used to report income and expenses for your self-employment activities for which no partnership exists or no entity has been established (such as a C or S-Corporation or LLC) – in other words, it is used for a sole proprietorship.  Of course there are exceptions and wrinkles to the rules.  Here are a few common ones.  In most states, a husband and wife which own and operate a business together would file a partnership return instead of a Schedule C.  However, since California is a community property state, a husband and wife should generally file two Schedule Cs and split the income and deductions based on their distributive shares, even if filing a joint return.

One important reason for doing this is that two Schedule SEs would also be filed reporting the Social Security and Medicare taxes separately for each spouse.  They would each be subject to the full taxable wage base for Social Security, but they would also each receive credit for their earnings which would figure into their Social Security checks in retirement.

An LLC with only one member that is operating a business would also report the business activity on a Schedule C instead of a 1065 Partnership return.  Since you can’t have a partnership between you and yourself, the formal entity structure is disregarded for federal tax purposes and reported like a sole proprietorship.  In community property states such as California, a husband and wife that both own and operate the business are actually considered one member for LLC purposes.  If they were the only two owners, the entity would be disregarded, but they would then report on two Schedule Cs as discussed above.

Now that we have discussed who uses the form, let’s move to the form itself.  The initial section of Schedule C asks for identifying information – the name of the business, the type of business, address, etc.  If you have an employer identification number you can enter that as well.  This would be required if you have employees on payroll.  You can also obtain one if you simply do not want to hand out your Social Security number whenever a formal taxpayer identification number is needed – such as for filing 1099-Misc forms for independent contractors.

There are also some other direct questions regarding your basis of accounting, level of participation, and filing compliance.  Most small businesses under $10 million in annual revenues operate by the cash method of accounting as it has many advantages.  Material participation is a tightly defined standard  by the IRS which can affect your ability to take losses in a down year.  The questions on 1099 filings are loaded questions designed to help the IRS easily identify businesses that are not filing required 1099s for payments to independent contractors, for interest received, etc.

In Part I Income, you list your gross receipts, subtract sales returns and allowances, subtract cost of goods sold (which are detailed in Part III) and then add other income such as interest income or certain credits.  Part III Cost of Goods Sold is mainly geared towards retailers, wholesalers, and manufacturers.  It provides a place to detail beginning and ending inventory and any associated labor and material costs associated with production of the goods.  Even taxpayers on a cash basis are generally required to track inventory.  Cash basis typically means you get the deduction when you spend the cash, and you record the income when you get the cash.  But with inventory, you do not get the deduction until the inventory is sold or disposed.

In Part II you detail all your expenses.  The instructions to Schedule C do a pretty good job of explaining what types of expenses they want on each line.  Some of the lines are supported by additional forms such Form 4562 Depreciation and Amortization feeding into Schedule C line 13 for Depreciation.  Line 24b for Meals and Entertainment is unique as most qualified meals and entertainment are allowed only a 50 percent deduction.  Another unique aspect is that preset per diem rate deductions are allowed for self-employed individuals (and employees) for meals, entertainment, and incidental expenses in lieu of tracking actual receipts.  Some of these per diems are quite generous depending on the location of travel, and taxpayers can sometimes get a much larger deduction than the amount they actually spend.

Line 30 for expenses for business use of your home is another example where an entirely separate form (Form 8829) is used to calculate the deduction.  There is also an alternative simplified method introduced with the 2013 returns that gives you $5 square foot for business space (up to $1,500) without having to track actual expenses on Form 8829.

Line 32 contains a few questions about whether your investment in the business is “at-risk” or not.  Basically they are asking if you are financially liable if things go south, and could you lose the money you have injected into the business in the past.  This affects your ability to take losses in down years.

Part IV details your vehicle deduction for standard mileage rate users.  For 2014, this amount is 56 cents a mile.  If you track actual expenses instead, you would not fill out this part.

Part V is for any additional expenses not discussed in Part II.

In two weeks we will continue our Back to Basics series with Schedule D – Capital Gains and Losses

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

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Sale of a Residence After Death – Part II

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

April 5, 2013

Two weeks ago we discussed the sale of a personal residence after someone passes away when held as joint tenants or community property.  We also discussed the concept of a cost basis step up (or down) to the current fair market value at death as it relates to joint tenancy, community property, and tenancy in common.  If you missed this article you can find it on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.  This week we are going to discuss what happens when a sole owner or tenant in common passes away and the house or fractional interest in a house goes to their trust or estate.

Often children are tasked with figuring out what to do with mom or dad’s house after the second spouse passes.  Names like executor, executrix, and trustee get thrown around and sometimes you get to know your accountant and attorney better than if you had gone on a fishing trip together!  After death, the house typically become part of the estate if there was no trust in place, and if there was, then it becomes part of an irrevocable trust that has the task of winding up affairs and distributing the assets to the beneficiaries (or trusts for the beneficiaries).

If the surviving spouse held the house as a sole owner or in his or her revocable trust before death, the house receives a full step-up (or down) in basis to the current fair market value at death.  If the house is distributed outright to a beneficiary (or beneficiaries) and then the beneficiary immediately sells the home, you often will have a loss due to the real estate commissions and other sales expenses (or perhaps even a market decline between date of death and the sale as we saw so often over the past five years).  This loss, however, will generally be a nondeductible personal loss unless you first convert it to a rental property, and then sell it later.

If, however, it is decided the house needs to be sold while it is still in the estate or trust in order to pay debts or to distribute the proceeds to various beneficiaries, you may have a case to take a deductible loss on the sale of the property (which would offset other taxable income in the estate or trust, or perhaps flow through to the beneficiaries reducing their personal taxes).  Fair warning, the IRS and the courts disagree on this issue!

The IRS has taken the position that even a trust or estate cannot take a loss unless it is a rental property or converted to a rental property and then sold.  However, this conflicts with some of the instructions they provide regarding capital assets held by trusts and estates. The courts, on the other hand, have held that a trust or estate does not hold personal assets, and thus is allowed to take a loss on the sale of what used to be the decedent’s personal residence as long as no beneficiaries live in the property in the interim.  There are other issues to consider here, but in the right circumstances, strategic planning could create some large tax savings.

If a tenant in common passes away, his or her ownership percentage receives a step in basis to the current fair market value and the interest flows through to the estate or trust.  Similar results would occur as those just discussed for sole owners.  It is less common to find someone holding a personal residence as a tenant in common, especially with unrelated people.  It also comes with other, more complicated issues, since fractionalizing ownership in a house diminishes the value – basically, who wants to buy a house with other people you don’t know?  In all cases after someone passes away, date-of-death appraisals are requisite, and you may need specialized appraisers for fractional interest properties.

This really just scratches the surface of the issues you can encounter, and it is always best to find a CPA and attorney team that is equipped to handle these issues appropriately.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Sale of a Residence After Death – Part I

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

March 22, 2013

When a living individual sells a personal residence that results in a gain, many people are familiar with the rules which may allow an exclusion of the taxable gain of up to $250,000 ($500,000 if married filing joint) if the taxpayer lived in the property two out of the last five years as his or her primary residence.  In the depressed real estate markets over the past few years, many people have also learned (sometimes to much dismay) that a loss on a personal residence is not deductible.

But what happens when a house is sold after someone passes away?

The first thing we need to do is determine the cost basis.   At the date of death, the cost basis of the property changes to whatever the current fair market value (FMV) is (an appraisal is required – not a market analysis by a real estate agent).  If the house is held in joint tenancy or tenancy in common, only the decedent’s share of the home gets a step up (or down) in basis to the current FMV, and the basis for the survivor’s original share does not change.

If, however, it is held as community property, the entire interest in the house gets a step in basis to the current FMV.  If the property is held “with rights of survivorship” then the house passes immediately to the survivor which in turn inherits the new stepped up (or down) basis of the decedent to add to his or her own basis-in the case of joint tenancy or tenancy in common, or he or she takes the new FMV as the new basis if it was community property.

When the property is sold, the survivor reports the sales price less the new basis and selling expenses.  If it was sold soon after death, the survivor often realizes a loss due to sales expenses if they got a full step-up in basis (albeit nondeductible if maintained as a personal residence).  If the survivor realizes a gain, then, the survivor is eligible for the $250,000 exclusion assuming he or she meets all the normal rules.  If it was a spouse that passed away, then the widow or widower would have two years from the date of death to sell the house and still be eligible for the $500,000 exclusion.

In two weeks we will discuss the more interesting scenarios that play out when the property is not held “with rights of survivorship” and the property goes to the individual’s estate or trust, such as is often the case at the death of a single individual or the death of the second spouse.

Remember, it is always best to seek competent advice as everybody’s tax situation is unique and there are more rules that could affect you than just those mentioned in this article.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Divorce Taxation – Part II

Originally published in the Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin

June 20, 2012

Community Property/Income and Deductions

A complicating factor with divorces is that state law governs a good bit of how taxation will work, and each state has different laws. California is one of nine community property states.  It is has similarities to other community property state tax laws, but differences as well.  In California, community property laws say that income and deductions derived or expended while married are generally split 50/50 during the community period.  The income and deductions generated after the community period ends belong to each taxpayer.  The community period for California purposes ends when the taxpayers separate with no intent to get back together.  This does not require a final decree of divorce or separate maintenance, but is based on facts and circumstances.

Many divorcing couples often take the approach, “You report your W-2 on your returns and I will report mine on my returns,” but that is technically not correct since in most cases they should each be reporting half of each other’s W-2 during the community period.  Spouses are required to provide the necessary information for the other spouse to file a complete and accurate return.  This situation can lead to an advantage or an abuse depending on the familiarity of each spouse with the tax laws.

Although the laws do get complex, generally speaking, community property is anything acquired during the community period, or any separate funds brought into the marriage that are tainted by intermingling the funds with community funds. If the taxpayer maintained any separate property during the marriage, then the income and deductions for separate property would go to the spouse who owned the property.  An example of this would be: Spouse A brings a rental property and a large bank account to the marriage and maintains it in his or her own name.  Spouse A uses the bank account exclusively for the rental property and pays all rental property expenses and deposits all the rental property income into the bank account.  Since there is no intermingling with any assets created after the marriage began, the property would maintain its character as separate property and the income and deductions would fall 100% to spouse A in the year of divorce.

Splitting Tax Withholdings and Estimates

Taxes withheld (such as with a W-2) during the community period are generally split 50/50.  Estimated tax payments made are credited under the taxpayer whose social security number is submitted with the payment.  Individuals going through a divorce should be alert to this as they may not realize the other spouse has made payments in their own name from community property funds.  For California, estimated payments with both social security numbers submitted are applied to the tax return of the first taxpayer to file.  However, taxpayers are supposed to submit a notarized statement signed by both individuals prior to either filing, specifying how the taxes withheld and joint estimates should be applied.  Note, a court order in the divorce proceedings will control and overrule any of these laws, including a retroactive application of joint estimated payments to the spouse the court order specifies.

To be continued next issue…

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Divorce Taxation – Part I

Originally published in the Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin

June 6, 2012

Once in a while, I work with clients that are going through a divorce.  And once in a while in those once in a whiles, I work with clients who are both happily going through the divorce process, and seem to get along better than most married couples I know!  Most of the time, however, it seems to be a challenging and confusing time with a lot of mixed feelings on both sides.  Another aspect of divorce that can be challenging and confusing is the taxation in the years surrounding the divorce.

One of the most common themes I see with individuals going through divorce is that many tax issues are not even considered in the process.  People know it is a good idea to hire an attorney, but they forget to consult a competent tax professional about how it will play out, or what they may want to have their attorney negotiate on their behalf.  For many people they think the only tax consideration is who gets to claim the child, if one is involved.  In reality, there are several big issues to consider, and the tax law can sting those who are not aware.

In the next few issues I will go over some of the ground rules and areas of interest pertaining to taxation during a divorce including filing status options, community property laws, splitting income and deductions, crediting tax withholdings and estimated payments, allocating carryforwards, effects of children, transferring assets, and court orders.  It is also important to note that state law heavily governs divorce taxation.  I will be speaking from the perspective of California residents throughout the articles.

Filing Status

A basic question when going through a divorce is “What filing status should I use?”  The answer is that it comes down to your status on the last day of the year.  Taxpayers are considered unmarried for tax purposes if the final decree of divorce or a decree of separate maintenance is obtained by the end of the year.  If either of those two triggering events occurs, they would file Single or Head of Household returns as applicable.  Otherwise, they are still considered married and would file joint returns or Married Filing Separate returns.

One interesting exception, however, is that one or both individuals can claim Head of Household status while still married if they meet the Head of Household rules, and the spouses did not live together during the second half of the year.  These rules are sometimes referred to as the “abandoned spouse rules.” Many tax preparers are unaware of these rules, but they can be quite advantageous since divorcing individuals often do not want to file jointly, and Head of Household status is typically much better than Married Filing Separate.

To be continued next week…

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.