Archive for the ‘cash basis’ Tag

Back to Basics Part X – Schedule F

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

February 20, 2015

When the Long family emigrated from Switzerland in 1737, they settled in the colony of South Carolina.  At the time, the headright system was in place, and every person received 50 acres of land for making the journey across the Atlantic.  The Longs stayed in South Carolina, and the land remained in our family until my dad and his sister-in-law sold the last remaining four hundred acres about ten years ago.  (Somewhere in our files we still have that original grant paperwork.)  Four hundred acres may sound like a lot to native Californians, but the phrase “dirt cheap” actually means something in other parts of the country!

Anyway, my dad grew up on that farm raising animals, picking cotton, and then in high school, packing peaches for another farmer in the area.  As time rolled on, farming became tougher for small farms, and the government eventually started paying my grandfather to NOT farm, and plant trees instead!  What a deal!  That was fine for my grandfather as he also had an architectural practice already dividing his time.  I am sure the subsidies he received were part of some government plan aimed at decreasing supply and driving up prices for other farmers, and I am sure he had to report those on a Schedule F – Profit or Loss from Farming.

Schedule F is our topic today.  Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog if you would like to catch up on our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns.

The header section of Schedule F is an information gathering area about the type of farming you do, your participation level in the business, and various other questions.  Similar questions can be found on Schedule C for businesses or Schedule E for rental or other supplemental income activities.

Schedule F is a two page form, and nearly half of that real estate is devoted to gathering income.  By comparison most other schedules in the tax return have a tiny section devoted to income gathering.  This is due to the wide variety of sources of farming income.

Section I covers income for cash basis farmers.  Cash basis simply means you declare income when you receive the money, and you deduct expenses when you pay out the money.  Section III on page two covers income gathering for accrual basis taxpayers.  This means income is declared when it is earned (not necessarily received), and expenses are deducted when incurred (not necessarily paid).

Farming has been at the root of American lives since the country was founded, and it is not always an easy or a consistent business to run.  As a result there are many special programs available to farmers (or non-farmers as in the case of my grandfather) as well as certain tax advantages.  Farmers may see income from all kinds of sources, many tied to government programs or insurance, such as direct payments, patronage dividends, counter-cyclical payments, price loss coverage payments, agriculture risk coverage payments, price support payments, market gain from the repayment of a secured Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) loan gains, diversion payments, cost-share payments (sight drafts), crop insurance proceeds, federal disaster payments, etc.

Due to the unpredictability of nature, there are even special provisions available to farmers that allow them to average their income over a three-year period. This is done by completing Schedule J.

You can imagine being a little upset if instead of having your income spread evenly over two years and being in a top bracket of 15 percent in both years, that you make zero in one year due to a drought and double in year two due to wonderful rain and sunshine, and then wind up in a 25 percent top bracket!  Not only did you suffer the hardship of having no income one year, but then you ended up with a bigger overall tax bill on the same amount of income.

Another example of a favorable provision says that if you have to sell livestock due to weather-related conditions, such as a drought, you have the option of reporting the income in the year following the sale.  So you get to defer the income.  Your farm must be located in an area qualified for federal aid due to the weather-related condition.

Part II of Schedule F deals with gathering expenses.  Due to the length of time it takes to get many crops or animals into a productive state, there are a lot of very specific rules regarding deducting versus capitalizing farm expenditures.

For example, if a crop takes more than two years growing time before it comes to fruition, you generally must capitalize the costs during the period. In most cases you can make an election to expense the costs, however.  The instructions to Schedule F tell us, “you cannot make this election for the costs of planting or growing citrus or almond groves incurred before the end of the fourth tax year beginning with the tax year you planted them in their permanent grove.”  As you can tell, the rules can get very specific depending on what you are growing, and where!

Similar to a Schedule C business, if an unincorporated farm is owned and operated by a husband and wife in a community property state, such as California, they should split the income and expenses according to the work performed and file two Schedule Fs.  This assists with filing two Schedule SEs for self-employment income for each.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Back To Basics Part VII – Schedule C

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

January 9, 2015

In this issue, we are discussing Schedule C -Profit or Loss from Business.  Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog if you would like to catch up on our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns.

Schedule C is generally used to report income and expenses for your self-employment activities for which no partnership exists or no entity has been established (such as a C or S-Corporation or LLC) – in other words, it is used for a sole proprietorship.  Of course there are exceptions and wrinkles to the rules.  Here are a few common ones.  In most states, a husband and wife which own and operate a business together would file a partnership return instead of a Schedule C.  However, since California is a community property state, a husband and wife should generally file two Schedule Cs and split the income and deductions based on their distributive shares, even if filing a joint return.

One important reason for doing this is that two Schedule SEs would also be filed reporting the Social Security and Medicare taxes separately for each spouse.  They would each be subject to the full taxable wage base for Social Security, but they would also each receive credit for their earnings which would figure into their Social Security checks in retirement.

An LLC with only one member that is operating a business would also report the business activity on a Schedule C instead of a 1065 Partnership return.  Since you can’t have a partnership between you and yourself, the formal entity structure is disregarded for federal tax purposes and reported like a sole proprietorship.  In community property states such as California, a husband and wife that both own and operate the business are actually considered one member for LLC purposes.  If they were the only two owners, the entity would be disregarded, but they would then report on two Schedule Cs as discussed above.

Now that we have discussed who uses the form, let’s move to the form itself.  The initial section of Schedule C asks for identifying information – the name of the business, the type of business, address, etc.  If you have an employer identification number you can enter that as well.  This would be required if you have employees on payroll.  You can also obtain one if you simply do not want to hand out your Social Security number whenever a formal taxpayer identification number is needed – such as for filing 1099-Misc forms for independent contractors.

There are also some other direct questions regarding your basis of accounting, level of participation, and filing compliance.  Most small businesses under $10 million in annual revenues operate by the cash method of accounting as it has many advantages.  Material participation is a tightly defined standard  by the IRS which can affect your ability to take losses in a down year.  The questions on 1099 filings are loaded questions designed to help the IRS easily identify businesses that are not filing required 1099s for payments to independent contractors, for interest received, etc.

In Part I Income, you list your gross receipts, subtract sales returns and allowances, subtract cost of goods sold (which are detailed in Part III) and then add other income such as interest income or certain credits.  Part III Cost of Goods Sold is mainly geared towards retailers, wholesalers, and manufacturers.  It provides a place to detail beginning and ending inventory and any associated labor and material costs associated with production of the goods.  Even taxpayers on a cash basis are generally required to track inventory.  Cash basis typically means you get the deduction when you spend the cash, and you record the income when you get the cash.  But with inventory, you do not get the deduction until the inventory is sold or disposed.

In Part II you detail all your expenses.  The instructions to Schedule C do a pretty good job of explaining what types of expenses they want on each line.  Some of the lines are supported by additional forms such Form 4562 Depreciation and Amortization feeding into Schedule C line 13 for Depreciation.  Line 24b for Meals and Entertainment is unique as most qualified meals and entertainment are allowed only a 50 percent deduction.  Another unique aspect is that preset per diem rate deductions are allowed for self-employed individuals (and employees) for meals, entertainment, and incidental expenses in lieu of tracking actual receipts.  Some of these per diems are quite generous depending on the location of travel, and taxpayers can sometimes get a much larger deduction than the amount they actually spend.

Line 30 for expenses for business use of your home is another example where an entirely separate form (Form 8829) is used to calculate the deduction.  There is also an alternative simplified method introduced with the 2013 returns that gives you $5 square foot for business space (up to $1,500) without having to track actual expenses on Form 8829.

Line 32 contains a few questions about whether your investment in the business is “at-risk” or not.  Basically they are asking if you are financially liable if things go south, and could you lose the money you have injected into the business in the past.  This affects your ability to take losses in down years.

Part IV details your vehicle deduction for standard mileage rate users.  For 2014, this amount is 56 cents a mile.  If you track actual expenses instead, you would not fill out this part.

Part V is for any additional expenses not discussed in Part II.

In two weeks we will continue our Back to Basics series with Schedule D – Capital Gains and Losses

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.