Archive for the ‘tax preparation fees’ Tag

Back to Basics Part XXXV – Form 8959 Additional Medicare Tax and Form 8960 – Net Investment Income Tax

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

March 25, 2016

Forms 8959 and 8960 are two relatively new forms that started with the 2014 tax year.  These are two of quite a number of tax increases that are being used to help fund ObamaCare.  Both of these forms affect people with income in excess of $200,000 for Single filers or 250,000 for Married Filing Jointly.

Form 8959 is the Additional Medicare Tax.  It is an additional 0.9% Medicare Part A tax on combined W-2 and self-employment wages in excess of the above stated thresholds.  Note that it is not based on  W-2 box 1 taxable wages, but on Medicare wages which are often higher for most people.  Pretax deductions such as contributions to retirement plans are included in Medicare wages, whereas they are not included in box 1 taxable wages.

Employers have to start collecting this additional tax once your wages hit the thresholds.  However, if you changed jobs during the year, the second employer will not withhold until the wages your earn with that employer reaches the thresholds.  This means that you could owe additional tax when you file your tax returns for the shortfall, since the new employer and old employer do not communicate to coordinate this tax.  For self-employed people, you would of course be sending in quarterly estimates of your income and self-employment tax liability, and the calculation of this new tax would be made on your income tax returns at year-end.

The Form 8960 is the Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT).  Once your income meets the thresholds previously discussed, you will also have an additional 3.8% tax on all investment related income.  This would include income sources such as interest income, dividend income, annuities, rents, royalties, capital gains distributions from mutual funds and capital gains from the sale of investments such as stocks and bonds.  Even real estate professionals would be subject to NIIT on their own rental real estate activities, unless they meet the material participation test specifically in rental real estate, which is a separate test from time spent in real estate sales activities, for instance.

If you own an interest in a business and you are not materially participating in the business, this income will also be subject to the net investment income tax.  Material participation generally means 500 hours or more during the year.  The sale of rental property and even second homes are also subject to NIIT.  If you sell an interest in a partnership or s-corporation and do not materially participate in the business, you will also be subject to NIIT on any gains from those sales.  Investment income from your children that are taxed on your returns through Form 8814 are also subject to NIIT.

Wages, unemployment compensation, alimony, Social Security benefits, tax-exempt interest income, income subject to self-employment taxes, and income from qualified retirement plan distributions are specifically excluded from the tax.

There are also some deductions that can be used to offset NIIT.  These expenses included investment interest expense, investment advisory and brokerage fees, expenses related to rental and royalty income, tax preparation fees, fiduciary expenses (in the case of an estate or trust) and state and local income taxes.

Regarding trusts and estate, it is important to note that the thresholds for NIIT are much lower.  Due to the compressed income tax bracket structure, NIIT kicks in when the trust or estate reaches the highest income tax bracket at only $12,300 of income (2015).  This provides additional incentive for trustees to push income out to the beneficiaries since many trusts will be subject to NIIT, but the beneficiaries are often not subject due to the much higher thresholds for individuals.

Planning can be an important tool to lower the impact of NIIT.

If you have questions about other schedules or forms in your tax returns, prior articles in our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog .

Travis H. Long, CPA, Inc. is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. Travis can be reached at 831-333-1041. This article is for educational purposes.  Although believed to be accurate in most situations, it does not constitute professional advice or establish a client relationship.

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Back to Basics Part V – Schedule A Wrap-Up

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

December 12, 2014

In this issue, we are finishing our discussion on Schedule A – Itemized Deductions.  Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog if you would like to catch up on our Back to Basics series on personal tax returns.

The fifth section of Schedule A is for personal casualty and theft losses.  This is designed to help people with major losses.  The deduction on schedule A is calculated by taking the amount of the loss, subtracting $100, then subtracting 10 percent of your adjusted gross income.  Any amount left over will be an itemized deduction (if any).  There are several ways to calculate the amount of the loss but it is generally limited to the lesser of your adjusted cost basis or the decrease in the fair market value.  Sometimes appraisals are necessary to establish the decrease, but in all cases, the amount of any insurance proceeds received would reduce the loss.  Another salient point is that the loss generally has to be sudden, unexpected, and permanent in nature; it is not the result of degrading over time.  For instance, a car accident or theft would qualify; termite damage would not qualify.  Losing something does not qualify either.  Business casualty losses are not reported on Schedule A.

The next section deals with miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to two percent.  This means you take all the deductions in this section, subtract two percent of your adjusted gross income, and the left over amount is your itemized deduction for this section (if any).  Some of the deductions here include unreimbursed employee business expenses, union dues, investment expenses, income tax consultations and preparation, legal expenses related to your job or to the extent they deal with tax issues or the protection of future taxable income, job search or education expenses (if they relate to your current field), etc.

Unreimbursed employee business expenses are those which are ordinary and necessary and the employer expects the employee to pay for the expenses.  If the employer has a reimbursement plan, but the employee simply fails to request reimbursement, the expense will not qualify.  It is best if the employer has a written policy, or as part of the employment agreement, spells out what things the employee is expected to cover.  Sales people can often have high deductions in this area through business miles on their vehicles and meals and entertainment for clients.  If a company provides no office space for an employee and the person has an office in his or her home, deductions can be taken for that as well.

Investment expenses paid to financial advisors or even IRA fees can be deductible.  Financial advisor fees must be prorated if you have taxable investment income and tax free investment income such as municipal bond interest.  Only the portion allocated to taxable income is deductible.  For IRA fees to be deductible, they must be paid with funds outside the retirement plan.  This is preferred anyway so as not to deplete your retirement account by using IRA funds to pay the fees.

The last section of deductions on Schedule A is called “Other Miscellaneous Deductions.”  These are NOT subject to the two percent of adjusted gross income floor, and the full amount become itemized deductions.  These are less frequently encountered and include things like Federal estate tax on income in respect of decedent, gambling losses up to the amount of winnings, losses from Ponzi schemes, casualty and theft losses on income-producing assets, amortizable bond premiums, unrecovered investments in annuities and other items.

The final part of Schedule A is one more “gotcha.”  If your income is over $305,050 for Married Filing Joint or $254,200 Single, part of your deductions begin to phase out.  Medical expenses, investment interest, casualty, theft, and gambling losses are not subject to the phase out.  The rest of the deductions can be reduced by as much as 80 percent!  The amount is determined by taking your adjusted gross income, subtracting the above figure based on your filing status, and multiplying the result by three percent.  That is your adjustment capped at the 80 percent maximum.

In two weeks we will continue our Back to Basics series with Schedule B – Interest and Ordinary Dividends.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.