Archive for the ‘$800’ Tag

Forming a Business Entity

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

September 19, 2014

Over the years, I have had many appointments with new and existing clients that are starting a small business for the first time.  We usually spend about an hour or so going through the basics of what to expect and be aware of: we cover things like self-employment taxes, tax estimates, business property tax statements, employees, insurance, sales tax, fictitious business name registration, business bank accounts, EINs, business licenses, etc.  One of the first things we talk about, however, is entity selection.  In other words, are you going to operate as a sole proprietorship, or will you form an LLC, S-corporation, C-corporation, partnership, etc.

Unfortunately, there are many people out there who pull the trigger early on entity selection based on something they hear from friends or find on the internet prior to getting tailored professional advice.  My feeling is that you really want to have a discussion about your particular situation with your accountant to provide input on the tax and accounting related issues and a business attorney to weigh in on liability, and other legal related issues before you get started.  The attorney should form the entity if you choose to operate other than as a sole proprietorship.

There are too many pitfalls, and I know there are many people out there that have made the wrong choice or, even worse, are operating with a presumption of liability protection when they have none because they did not properly form or respect the formalities of the entity.  Opposing counsel could have a victory on their hands if you failed to prepare annual corporate minutes, for instance. “Piercing the corporate veil” could suddenly enter your lexicon.

Online companies attempt to make it cheap and quick to form an entity for you, but I can tell you from my experience that many of the entities formed this way are later corrected or scrapped and redone by an attorney if one is hired to review it.  One of the problems, is that you have to be an attorney to render legal advice, and since it is rare for online companies to have attorneys for you to discuss your situation with, you may not choose the best entity or get all the language in your formation documents that you need.

Online companies also have difficulty conveying in an effective manner the important things to keep up with and staying in touch regarding these issues.  Many of the people who have used online services show up in my office with a fat binder that was shipped to them in the mail of which they have very little understanding; often has blanks that were never filled out; and has been collecting dust on the shelf.

I also hear from a fair number of these people that get notices from California requesting tax returns and a bunch of money for entities the taxpayer stopped operating years ago or maybe never even started aside from setting up the entity.  Unfortunately no one was there to advise them on how to properly close the entity.  The taxpayer often thinks that if they stop operating or decide not to go ahead with the business that they are done.  It doesn’t work this way.  I have even had people that formed an entity online and were shocked that they would have an $800 minimum fee to California each year.

There is a general push from many directions for people to establish entities for their small businesses these days.  In two weeks we will discuss the merits (or not) of this presumption.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

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IRS Affected by Government Shutdown

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

October 4, 2013

Due to the inability of Congress to come to terms regarding the government shutdown (or just about anything for that matter), I have a pretty good chance that this article will still be worth reading by the time it is published in the newspaper on Friday!

Everyone is aware by now that over 800,000 federal employees are on furlough. I read that this is more than all the employees of Target, General Motors, Exxon, and Google combined.  That is a lot of people!  Included in these 800,000 are most of the Internal Revenue Service employees.

Many of you may be cheering right now, but certainly not anyone that is waiting on a refund or currently trying to work out any problems with the IRS.  Prior to the furlough, telephone wait times to speak with an IRS agent have been 15 – 45 minutes, or sometimes you would get the message that they were too busy to even put you on hold, and then hang up on you.  Right now you will have an indefinite wait since the call centers are completely closed.  All local IRS offices are also closed to the public as well.  The shutdown will of course put even more pressure on wait times when funding is restored, and there is a backlog of problems to resolve.

This is an interesting time to be shutdown considering that extended personal tax returns are due on October 15.  The IRS still expects individuals and businesses to file all tax returns on time, keep making income and payroll tax payments, etc.  Presumably, they have some essential employees still on-the-clock to let the mailman in and to make deposits!  They are encouraging electronic filing since those returns are processed automatically by computers.  Paper returns will not be processed, however any payments enclosed will still be processed!  All tax refunds are suspended until normal operations resume.

Computer generated IRS notices will continue to be mailed out, but all audits, appeals, and taxpayer advocate cases are suspended.  If you had meetings scheduled they will be rescheduled.

The IRS website will still be up and running, but certain services may be unavailable.  The IRS automated telephone system will also still be working (800) 829-1040.

I can only assume that penalties and interest will still accrue even if you are waiting on the IRS to resolve an issue.

I called the IRS employee emergency hotline for kicks.  They are informing employees that they cannot perform any work, even if they want to volunteer their time to keep certain cases moving, and they cannot use any government computers, equipment, or other resources.  If they were en route traveling when the furlough began, they were to immediately return home.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Rental Property Outside of CA: LLC Options and Issues – Part II

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

July 12, 2013

Two weeks ago, I discussed that LLCs are a popular choice for holding rental property, but that it certainly comes at a cost in California when you consider a minimum $800 annual franchise tax, the cost of filing another tax return each year, having to maintain better accounting records, as well as the initial costs to set it all up.  I also advised that if you do setup an LLC, you want to utilize an attorney to set things up instead of a do-it-yourself online approach.  I have seen plenty of problems from people using the latter method.  It is pretty easy to jeopardize the liability protections of the LLC if you do not have competent legal advice.  Since liability protection is one of the main reasons you go to all this continued expense and trouble, you might want to consider the old adage: penny-wise, pound-foolish.

Two weeks ago, I also raised the question and left readers pondering about whether you could save the minimum $800 a year tax by setting up your LLC in another state, which of course would be a natural inclination anyway, if the property is located in another state.

Many Californians are already in this boat, and I would say quite a number of them are unaware that even if they have a non-California LLC holding non-California rental property, they are generally required to register in California and pay California the minimum $800 franchise tax.  The franchise tax is levied on you if you are considered doing business in California.  So how is your rental property in Arizona, for example, that is held in an Arizona LLC (that maybe even loses money every year) considered doing business in California and subject to a minimum $800 California tax?

California’s position is that the mere fact that a managing member of the LLC lives in California, is enough to constitute that the LLC is doing business in California.  More specifically, they say that if you have more than one member, LLCs are taxed under partnership law unless you elect to be treated as a corporation.  Partnership law says that the activities of the partnership flow through and are attributed to the partners, and that the partners are therefore, by statute, doing business.  If they reside in California, then they are doing business while in California, thus requiring registration of the LLC in California and payment of the $800 minimum franchise tax (and filing of a tax return).  Limited partners also have statutory rights to participate so California is not letting them off the hook either.

Single member LLCs (a husband and wife are treated as one member in California) are disregarded entities for tax purposes and are not taxed as partnerships or corporations, but are reported directly on your personal tax returns.  For single member LLCs and corporations California will look to facts and circumstances.  If you could somehow build a case that your LLC had absolutely no connections with California (such as tax preparation, bank accounts, etc.) and that every time any decision needed to be made with regard to managing your property or LLC, you were out of the state of California (and not on your living room telephone), you might have a shot at not “doing business” in California! It is an extremely difficult threshold, and taxpayers have been losing case after case in court over this issue.

California has also put into place a steep new penalty for anyone failing to register.  In addition to the minimum $800 franchise tax, they are now assessing a $2,000 penalty plus interest for every year you have failed to register.  At about, $3,000 a year, that adds up quickly. Generally, California does not go back to assess past delinquencies if you start reporting before they discover you.  The internet and increased sharing of information between state taxing authorities is making this much easier to detect.  So make haste and get compliant if you are not already.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.

Rental Property Outside CA: LLC Options and Issues – Part I

Originally published in the Cedar Street Times

June 28, 2013

A lot of Californians find themselves with rental property outside the state at some point in their lives.  Sometimes it is from a past life in another state, or from an inheritance when a parent passes away.  Military folks often jog around the country collecting houses like refrigerator magnets from each state in which they have lived.  There are also a lot of people that invest in rental properties in Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas because you actually have a shot at a positive cash flow situation right out of the gates, unlike California.  And then there is the Hawaiian contingency that buy investment properties that always need at least two to four weeks of maintenance work done by the owners each year – not sure if I want one of those with all that work – it’s funny, I never hear of clients having to go to Phoenix for a month in the summer to work on those properties.

Anyway, the question always arises about whether or not to form an entity such as a corporation or Limited Liability Company (LLC) to hold the real property.  An LLC is generally the preferred vehicle to hold real property for many good reasons, including liability protection for your personal assets in the event you are sued, and the elimination of double taxation that can plague corporations.  They also have less formalities to follow compared to a corporation and avoid some nasty pitfalls of corporate tax rates and structure that could cause a lot of pain upon sale of the property.

As a result, a lot of people these days do hold property in LLCs.  Of course this comes at a price.  If you create an LLC in California (or a corporation for that matter) to hold your property, and are therefore granted the privilege of doing business in California, you are also granted the privilege of paying California a minimum $800 franchise tax each year.  You also have to pay someone like me to file another tax return every year, and you have to keep better books.  Don’t forget you have to hire an attorney to set it up initially for another $1,500 to $3,000.

I would not recommend an online filing company or do-it-yourself approach, as you are not getting any legal advice and have no one keeping you on track with formalities which could completely blow the liability protections and the whole reason you went to all the effort in the first place.  Correcting or trying to close ill-formed or mishandled entities can be a real pain as well.

So what if you form your LLC in another state such as Texas or Wyoming to hold your property?  Many states have much lower or no annual LLC fee and they have simpler annual filing requirements.  (You generally do not have to form the LLC in the state where the property is located.)  Could you save some dollars by setting up your LLC in another state?  In two weeks we will discuss California’s current position on non-California LLCs and some new rules that are just coming into play.  If you have a non-California LLC, you do not want to miss the next installment.

Prior articles are republished on my website at www.tlongcpa.com/blog.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: To the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Travis H. Long, CPA is located at 706-B Forest Avenue, PG, 93950 and focuses on trust, estate, individual, and business taxation. He can be reached at 831-333-1041.